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the course of the year. thankfully we've been very u.s.-centric in our investments over the course of 2011-2012. what we're preparing for now is looking again at the foreign markets in 2013. >> foreign markets meaning you want to be allocating money outside of the u.s. because of these issues in the u.s.? >> well, taking a look at some of the large global players here in the u.s. and outside, because as tax rates go up here in the united states, what we're about to see is probably the laugher curve in reverse. tax rates going up, revenues declining, creating a headwind for gdp. we're look at companies in the world for looking for global growth opportunity outside our borders. >> mark, let me get your standpoint on this. all year all we've been hearing about are dividend payers. why? because the yield -- there's no yield anywhere with rates where they are. everyone is searching for yield. they've found it in some companies that actually pay dividend, etf that pay dividend. there's a lot of those that have done so well. is this the time to avoid or sell those companies now or not? >> well, i
than the rest of the world. the u.s. is starting to show good trends. in an area that capital spending might be flat or plus 2%, enterprise is starting to show some signs of coming back outside of europe. commercial marketplace, which is what i watch the most, is also doing okay. so i would assume government's going to continue to be tough, especially the u.s. federal government. public sector around the world, okay. in the u.s., not counting federal. good in asia-pacific. still challenging in europe. >> we're looking at challenges in the u.s., obviously. i want to get your take on what's going on with with taxes and what your expectations are. first off, you've got 87% of total cash held overseas. is that right? >> that is probably pretty accurate. probably in excess of $40 billion. >> what are the pans to repay trait? is it worth taking a tax hit to invest domestically, or it's too expensi expensive, so you leave that money overseas until you see a change in tax code? >> we're at a cross roads. we clearly want to put this money to use in a way that benefits our shareholders. if we be
the looming fiscal cliff. he says failure to do so could pose, quote, a substantial threat to the u.s. economy. >> the realization of all the automatic tax increase and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff absent offsetting changes would pose a substantial threat to the recovery. indeed, by the reckoning of the congressional budget office, the cbo, and that of many outside observers. a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into recession. >> but the fiscal cliff does not really worry my next guest. he describes it as the y2k of the moment. joining me now to explain is a well-known fed critic jim grant. he's founder and editor of "grant's interest rate observer." you say this is like y2k. no big deal. came and went. you're not worried about it. you say the markets aren't going to fret over it. >> i don't mean to be quite so dismissive. certainly my experience of problems that are most ventilated are the ones that are least menacing, in fact. the more you talk about something, the more it's likely to be discounted. we've done nothing but talk about the fiscal clif
because the underlying fundamentals in the u.s. economy are clearly improving, and you also have a stabilization or soft landing happening in china at the same time. >> david kelly, what do you want to be doing here? what's your strategy for the fiscal cliff? do you think we go over it, and what do you want to do? >> for a long-term investor, you don't try and play this one. i agree with stephanie about the market probably going higher once they get a resolution. they will get a resolution. it's possible it could go into early january. i still think they're more likely to get a resolution done before the end of the year. either way, they'll get a resolution done. when that happens, then we'll resort to looking at the u.s. economy, which is strengthening a bit here. also, the extreme and relative valuations between high-quality fixed income and equities will push money towards equities. i would not run for cover here because of the volatility. i think you just have to, you know, hold your ground through this and hope that the market moves higher next year. >> bob, this activity at
down. we stress doing it in local currency. the other areas are u.s. high yield, which i still think is valuable. we do think spreads will contract and emerging market equities as well. >> jordan, what about you? how are you preparing for what could be an eventuality where we go over the cliff and we've got to deal with higher taxes and a slower economy? a lot of people expecting recession in 2013, if, in fact, this occurs. >> think about what works well in a slow-growth economy. consumer products companies do well. high dividend payers. you'll see 100 companies that have already declared dividends this month. those are the strongest companies in the market. those are the ones that can afford to buy back shares or invest in high r.o.e. projects next year. i wouldn't avoid them just thinking dividend taxes are going up. they're the strongest in the market. you also have energy infrastructure, which is paying about 6%. most of it is a return of principle. these are companies with some of the lowest cost of capital ever. high return projects, long-term contracts. the government is in su
that the u.s. doesn't go into a recession? >> well, first i want to say the metaphor fiscal cliff is probably the wrong one. you step off a cliff, that's your last step. for many politicians, the real metaphor is it's a slope. they gradually go into these tax increases and spending cuts. they feel they can turn around and walk back up the slope, retroactively reverse the changes. in that circumstance, in that scenario, it creates a lot of uncertainty for businesses and for taxpayers. what will our taxes be next year? how are we going to make some plans for our business or personal finances? it's that uncertainty that's going to, i think, have adverse effects for the economy. >> okay. that makes a lot of sense. michael jones, how do you want to invest here with all this? >> i think there are times when the market is really simple. don't fight the fed. you certainly don't want to fight the fed when they've got the ecb, the bank of japan, the people's bank of china, and virtually every other central bank on their side. you've had unprecedentedly aggressive monetary stimulus. we have open-ended c
, there is some risk there and maybe something needs to be done. but we're lumping in u.s. treasury money funds, u.s. government agency money funds, muni money funds. are we going to say they're subject to credit loss also? we have to get more specific about these major policy changes rather than throwing a blanket over an entire industry. >> great point. we're going to leave it there. you're betting on whether or not we go over the fiscal cliff this year. what do you think? >> i'm worried. >> you're frworried. >> i don't see the leadership at this point in time i'm hoping to see from the white house. >> walt, great to have you on the program. really appreciate it. walter is the president and ceo of the charles schwab corporation. >>> meanwhile, the honeywell ceo was at that fiscal cliff meeting with president obama today. it just wrapped up. he joins us now for a first-on cnbc interview from the white house. david, good to have you on the program. thank you so much for joining us. >> thanks. good to be here. >> okay. so leading up to this meeting with the president, you were skeptiabou seeing a dea
see things that are happening not only in the u.s. but on a global basis. it would lead me to believe that the market could be up 10% or more next year. i would -- >> what are you seeing when you say you are looking around the world that makes you believe we'll go higher? >> i see several things. i see emerging markets have slurmd in the second half of the year. i think those are improving, specifically in china. i see the eurozone committed to economic stimulus through their monetary system in the ecb. i think that's very positive for that market. and in the u.s. here, i see employment getting better. i see clarity on the fiscal cliff next year and i see the housing market getting better around better and i think that's a positive. >> rick santelli, it wasn't just stocks rallying today. here in the u.s., europe had its best week of the year this week. the euro is at a three-week high. gold was very strong today. what's the market telling us right now? >> i think the market's telling us that there's a lot of bargain hunting and a lot of optimism towards europe. that made sense. i thin
. >>> clicks and profits, u.s. consumers are expected to spend at least $1.5 billion on this cyber monday. we'll run through the cyber winners and losers next. >>> here's another number. $5 billion, that's how much americans are expected to spend on christmas gifts for their pets this year. we'll talk to petsmart ceo in a cnbc exclusive about his company's share of this huge holiday booty coming up. >>> plus, flu shot or your job? 150 employees getting canned the day before thanksgiving for refusing to get flu shots. is that legal? stay with us. i put away money. i was 21, so i said, "hmm, i want to retire at 55." and before you know it, i'm 58 years old. time went by very fast. it goes by too, too fast. ♪ but i would do it again in a heartbeat. [ laughs ] ♪ ♪ you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's poten
performance in the quarter. >> what are you seeing in market demand globally? sales increased in the u.s. and abroad. are you seeing a stronger global story today? >> we are. about 2/3 of our business is in latin america. most of the latin american countries in the mid-single digits. we see better category growth in general. category growth in the u.s. is picking up, however. we saw about almost 1.5% to 2% category growth in the u.s. that's a big reversal from where it was two years ago where it was down 2%. we're starting to see the consumer stabilize in the u.s. we're certainly seeing better growth in latin america in particular. >> let me ask you about the implications of hurricane sandy. first off, these gas lines in new york. the story has been just horrible with people unable to get gasoline because these gas stations do not have power. has this impacted your business? >> it hasn't yet, maria. we have one major manufacturing facility in the path of the storm. that was in aberdeen, maryland. our folk there is had the plant shut down for about 24 hours from midday monday to midday tu
softer condition and background in europe politically. and i think improving conditions here in the u.s. for the consumer and for manufacturing and for gdp in general. our general background is pretty positive. >> great points there. sandy, what about you? you say regardless of who wins the election, the fiscal cliff would be either downsized or deferred. what does that mean? >> well, i think downsizing is more likely. have you to factor in the hurricane as well because that's going to be a half a percentage point decline as well, coupled with, you need to get that fiscal cliff down to 1% or maybe 0.5%. i think the downsizing has to be pretty substantial. they're either going to have to defer it to the new congress and either a new administration or the existing one, but they've got to get it downsized pretty substantially pretty quickly. and it's going to require, because of that gridlock we're going to have again, a bipartisan concurrence. that's going to be the test in 2013. >> chris, what do you think? how do you want to invest with $1.5 billion under management, how are you allocat
thing that's changed a little bit is the u.s. has to take its tough medicine. tough medicine is we have to deal with issues like austerity and budgets and taxes. that's what europe has gone through the last three or four years. my guess is going forward this is the opportunity for europe to outshine the u.s. not that the u.s. will be a bad place to be, but incrementally, i think europe really looks good post-election. >> europe is going to outshine the u.s., huh? >> only because people are expecting such terrible things out of europe that when you expect terrible and you get, you know, so-so, that's an upside surprise any way you look at it. >> all right. we'll leave it there. gentlemen, thank you very much. we'll keep watching both those stories. let's get to john fort. he just spoke with the qualcomm ceo on the heels of their earnings report. let's find out what he has to say. john, over to you. >> maria, you already mentioned the headline numbers. i want to focus on guidance and a bit of color. that might change the way people are thinking about some elements of technology, and parti
that is a point of view, i think that assumes they really don't tackle the fiscal deficit. i think the u.s. economy, there's so much money on the sidelines, both in business and retail investors. it wouldn't take much positive momentum. i don't think the bar is that high that people -- you know, they really want to get back to business. i think -- >> but we just have to accept less than we would have gotten historically. >> oh, absolutely. i think right now it's still going to be a long, slow recovery. i don't think it's going to magically come back and shoot and a everything is going to go. it still will be a long, slow recovery. we've come to a difficult crisis. it's a financial crisis. they take time to heal. right now it's about confidence. we really need that leadership and some kind of sentiment in a direction will be helpful. >> real quick, maria bartiromo was speaking with the charles schwab ceo earlier this week. they're cutting their etf fees, which puts pressure on everybody in the industry. will you be doing the same? >> well, we don't manufacture etfs. we have what we call an
world. very selectivity. >> where are you finding them? >> u.s.-based companies. i'm looking for companies whose primary operations are in the u.s. as opposed to emerging markets xhshgs is how i felt for the last few years. i think sectors such as pharma, specialty and big pharma, i think reit sector is very interesting because they can take advantage of the low treasury rates, and i think in the tech space there are a few opportunities but very selective to a handful of companies. >> i'm going to look at you here, joe. bellwether stocks and what they say about the nature of the market. years ago ibm was the bellwether stock. for years general electric, our former parent company, was the bellwether. now apple is with this huge rally today. i know you're a little skeptical about what this rally's employ tod -- about today. but do you follow it? >> i think everybody will agree on the cause but it's the longevity is where i take issue. apple will remain a proxy just because it has, obviously, enormous cash hoard. people are talking about what the dividend will look like. is that
that are interested. and we have financial players that are interested. we have international interests as well as u.s. and domestic. >> i'm not sure if you heard the last interview, but we spoke with one of your union members from the bakers union. he basically said, look, you can't negotiate with terrorists, and they were stealing our pension. in retrospect, was there an area where you could have given to keep some of these union members happier? >> well, you know, it's interesting. i think, you know, i came on board in february after the bankruptcy filing to try to get the company out. and i would readily admit, i think there's a lot of bad history here and a lot of places to point the finger for blame. i don't spend a lot of time doing that because that's sort of like bayonetting the dead in the battlefield. if i could look back, i would say i think there were management mistakes. i think there were union mistakes. as a turnaround guy, i think it should have been done prefiling. these parties negotiated all last year and never got anywhere. i think in retrospect, you could always do different thin
another couple of percentage points on the upside. keep in mind that the u.s. economy is still growing at a 1% to 2% happenedndle on gdp. like your previous guests mentioned, this fiscal drag that will occur in 2013. so, you know, 1% move in the market today is just noise. we have to look towards what global gdp is going over the course of the next 18 months. that's decelerating. >> so what you're saying, chad, is it doesn't mat who ater who the white house. >> 2013 is going to look exactly like 2012. global gdp will be decelerating. the u.s. economy should perhaps be at a 1% to 2% gdp growth trajectory. that's including a fiscal drag in the united states of about 1%. that's our baseline assumption. but one should consider also that over in europe, you're going to be going into a recession in 2013. and our expectation there is for, perhaps, a 1% contraction. that's going to affect the financial markets here in the united states. one should not dilute themselves of that fact. >> maria, i think that the market today is probably as much about just election uncertainty coming out of the ma
dropping 50% here in the u.s. and unemployment spiking another 4%. what's different this year in the worst case scenario, the federal reserve is including a hypothetical slip down in asia with additional weakness in china. back to you. >> all right, mary. thank you so much. keep it right here. alan simpson and erskine bowles are next on this special "rise above" edition of the "closing bell." >>> coming up, fixing the fiscal mess. alan simpson and erskine bowles sit down with maria on the eve of the critical meeting between the president and congressional leaders. could their plan be the key to stopping america from going over the fiscal cliff? this exclusive event is next right here on this special edition of the "closing bell." iy stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see what criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and narrow down to exactly those stocks you want to follow. i'm mark allen of fidelity investments. the expert strategies feature is one more innovative reason serious investors are c
.5% minutes before the close. u.s. regulators approve jpmorgan's $3 billion stock buyback. that was lifting shares earlier. as you can see, finished lower with the rest of the group at the end of trade. hospital stocks did soar wednesday now that we know obamacare is likely here to stay. now hoptd names are selling off. down about 4% or more. those concerns about coal persisted in thursday's trade. they continued to slide lower as investors bet the president's re-election will lead to increased regulation for the industry. we know mitt romney was more of a fan of coal stocks. but he will not be our president. we now know. mar maria, back to you. >> court, thanks. meanwhile, what's the deal with groupon? the daily deal website's latest results out just minutes ago. we'll talk about what groupon needs to survive. the story next. plus, more on this busy edition of the "closing bell." >>> coming up, the empire strikes gold? >> hello there. >> disney's ceo bob iger joins maria for a first-on interview to talk earnings and the acquisition that adds the star wars franchise to the magic kingdom's g
of the big stories we were following today. zion is a stock on the radar today. the u.s. treasury will sell and conduct auctions to tell warrant positions in the name. also, hpq, that saga continues after a request from the former autonomy ceo to acquisition details of accounting fraud. some pockets of strength today. we were led higher by monster beverage. just one of those names people love to trade. regulatory fears subsiding a bit in that name. also want to draw your attention to corning. that stock getting a pop. last but not least, best buy. positive speculation in this name relating to a bid from the company's founder sending the stock up more than 3%. michelle. >> thank you so much, jackie. all right. just 34 days to go before we go over the fiscal cliff. >> oh, boy. >> i want to call it the fc. can't we get an abbreviation? we're going to l.a. we're going to ec. we're going over the fc. >> sounds good. >> are shareholders best served by companies paying dividends now? someone who's going to join us says absolutely not. find out why. >>> also, later, who would have thunk financial a
dallas fed president fisher who is going to talk about the fiscal challenges in the u.s. and abroad. you look at yesterday, harry reid opens his mouth, no deal done and market falls 80, today boehner comes out saying that tax revenue is on the table and here we are up 100 points. i'll be buying good quality growth companies that any fallback from the fiscal cliff and i'm going to be buying. >> your 30 seconds starts now. >> yeah, well, today the s&p 500 tested the 200-day moving average. as we close out the month of november. we've seen relative strength in small cap stocks over large cap stocks. we're looking for that relationship to hold up, as well. and tomorrow we'll be looking at the growth number, which of course, consensus will expect an increase. we don't think it'll be a game changer because of the head winds such as the fiscal cliff, but we think it'll contribute to optimism about the economy. >> you're in a
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20